Exhibits

  • Pieces of Paper: Cards and Certificates and Their Role in the Recent PastSeveral decades into the digital revolution, it is clear that digital devices have had an enormous impact upon the routines of literacy. This effect is every bit as profound as that brought about by the print revolution of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Moreover, the digital universe is arguably much broader than the universe of moveable type. After all, the latter, in simplistic terms, was only a superior way to deal with a medium—parchment/paper—that had been around for millennia. In both cases, the “revolution” involved enhancements in the production, dissemination, and storage of information. But power over information has always meant power plain and simple for the persons in charge of society.
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  • The Hugo Black Study at the Bounds Law LibraryThis post offers a glimpse into the home study of United States Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black through descriptions of its furnishings and numerous books. Several books illustrate Black’s significant interest in the classics while Martin Luther King, Jr.’s book, Stride Toward Freedom, provides an example of the many books Black received as gifts containing interesting inscriptions.
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  • 2018 Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction: An ExhibitThe winner of the 2018 Harper Lee Prize for legal fiction is C.E. Tobisman’s Proof.
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  • An Exhibit: Early Statutory Compilations and CodesThe books presented in this post may seem to be nothing more than dusty old lawbooks, but they are in fact the mortal remains of Alabama’s frontier period. The energetic, mostly young men who made up Alabama’s legislatures faced the issues—national and local—of Jacksonian America. In response they spelled out their attitudes, self-interests, and startling biases for future generations to ponder. So in the adventurous spirit of that time, we invite our readers to read the signposts of what were once new ideas. We encourage you to visit our physical exhibit “Early Statutory Compilations and Codes” located in the main hall of UA’s Law Library.
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  • Alice in Court: An Exhibit Taken from Editions of Alice’s Adventures in WonderlandThe following post, “Alice in Court,” seeks to describe the legal aspects of one of the world’s great fantasy stories–Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. The exhibit includes works in a Lewis Carroll collection assembled by Litera Scripta co-editor Paul M. Pruitt, Jr.
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  • Hugo Black and the Classics: An ExhibitHugo Black and the Classics is an exhibit in the University of Alabama School of Law Library’s Hugo Black Study that offers insight into Justice Black’s strong interest in Greek and Roman classical works. The collection shown here represents one component of the more than one thousand volumes of Black’s books held at the Bounds Law Library.
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  • Kenneth A. Roberts and the United States Capitol Shooting of 1954: An Exhibit from our CollectionsOn March 1, 1954, two hundred and fifty-four members of the Eighty-third Congress were debating immigration issues when a Puerto Rican Flag was unfurled and pistol fire erupted in the House of Representatives chamber. Four Puerto Rican nationalists fired thirty shots at the representatives below, wounding five of them. One of the wounded was the Democratic representative from Alabama’s Fourth District, Kenneth A. Roberts who was shot in the leg. This exhibit represents items in our collections from this event.
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  • The Knights Templar: an Exhibit from our CollectionsLitera Scripta is pleased to announce a new exhibit from our collections. The Knights Templar is represented in the Bounds Law Library’s collections mostly in the form of nineteenth and early twentieth century Masonic materials. Many rituals of the medieval order are depicted—often in great detail—in these works. Selections from our collection include manuals, bylaws, rituals, an “Authentic Account of the Imprisonment, Torture, and Martyrdom of Free Masons and Knights Templars…,” as well as an 1861 Alabama legislative act incorporating the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar. The exhibit also features an original document; a 1911 certificate of knighthood from the Grand Commandery of the state of Tennessee. The Bounds Law Library’s Templar exhibit is located in the John C. Payne Special Collections Reading Room and we welcome visitors during regular Special Collections hours.
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  • Justice Hugo Black Study ReopensLitera Scripta is pleased to announce that following significant renovations this summer, the Hugo Black Study at the Bounds Law Library has reopened to visitors. The exhibit, which is a replica of Justice Black’s Alexandria Virginia study, underwent improvements including repainting, a new ceiling, and redesigned lighting. The collection is located in room 211 in the library.
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  • Historic Maps of Alabama: Judge Benjamin Cohen ExhibitLitera Scripta, the Special Collections Blog of the Bounds Law Library, is pleased to announce a new exhibit featuring a collection of historic Alabama maps donated by Judge Benjamin G. Cohen. The maps were acquired by Judge Cohen during and after litigation of the Alabama and Mississippi Boundary Case [470 U.S. 93 (1985)], in which he and Dean Mark Brandon of the University of Alabama School of Law represented the state as assistant attorney generals. The framed maps are displayed in the central hallway of the Bounds Law Library.
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